Have you been considering seeking out additional supports for your child’s gross motor development? Sometimes families come to us with specific programs or interventions they have heard of that they are interested in learning more about or pursing for their child. Dynamic Movement Intervention is one such intervention. We have highlighted some general information about this technique, as well as what it could look like as part of a child’s therapy session through CI.

 

 

What is Dynamic Movement Intervention (DMI)?

Dynamic Movement Intervention (DMI) is a comprehensive intervention that incorporates current research on neurorehabilitation, technologies, and methodologies.  This therapeutic technique is used by physical (PT) and occupational therapists (OT) to treat children with gross motor impairments by improving and/or provoking a desired action with great emphasis on alignment, sensory integration, and function.  The goal is to promote progress toward developmental milestones and improve functional movements such as rolling, sitting, standing, and walking.

 

 

 

What does DMI look like?

The goal of DMI is for your child to move independently.  With this being said, no other equipment other than the box set and table are used.  Generally, bracing, such as SMOs or AFOs, and walkers are not utilized.  DMI can be implemented in a child’s therapy as young as 1-3 months of age.  Candidates for DMI include children diagnosed with any type of motor delay including but not limited to conditions such as: Down Syndrome, Cerebral palsy, global developmental delay, hypotonia, chromosomal abnormalities/genetic disorders, spinal cord lesions or acquired brain injury may benefit from this form of therapy.

 

 

 

DMI at CI Pediatric Therapy Centers:

Each child seen at CI is unique and presents with different abilities.  DMI can be combined with other therapy techniques and equipment already utilized at CI such as Intensive Model of Therapy (IMOT), Therasuit®, and Universal Exercise Unit.  DMI allows our therapists to create individualized programs that can be implemented at the clinic and at home through a home exercise plan.  Daily implementation of the home exercise program is essential for optimal outcomes.

 

Check with your CI team to discuss if DMI may be a good match for your kiddo and which locations we are able to offer it

 

 

For more information on DMI please go to https://dmitherapy.com/

 

 

References:

  1. Dynamic movement INTERVENTION (DMI) Therapy. SMILE Therapy for Kids. https://smiletherapyforkids.com/dynamic-movement-intervention-dmi-therapy/. Published February 20, 2021. Accessed September 16, 2021.
  2. Dynamic Movement Intervention. Dynamic movement intervention. Dynamic Movement Intervention. https://dmitherapy.com/. Accessed September 16, 2021.